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Sheriff’s deputy hospitalized after attack by man with a baseball bat

ENCINITAS — A San Diego County sheriff’s deputy was hospitalized after surviving an attack by a man with a baseball bat on Saturday, Dec. 15 in Encinitas, law enforcement officials said. 

The suspect was identified as 53-year-old Frederick Gramcko. Gramcko was arrested and booked into Vista Detention Facility on charges of attempted murder of a peace officer, according to a San Diego Sheriff’s Department release. 

The deputy was later treated for multiple fractures at Scripps Encinitas.

At around 2:36 p.m., the Sheriff’s Communications Center had received several calls about a man on a ladder hitting red-light cameras with a bat at the intersection of North El Camino Real and Encinitas Boulevard. 

At approximately the same time, a deputy in a patrol car witnessed Gramcko striking the cameras

After refusing multiple requests to drop the weapon, the deputy attempted to subdue Gramcko with a Taser but the device malfunctioned.

The suspect swung his bat at the officer several times before the deputy pulled out his baton and struck Gramcko in another attempt to subdue him.

The suspect then fled towards the Shell gas station parking lot.

The deputy caught up with Gramcko who attacked the officer again before the suspect was eventually detained with a WRAP restraint device. 

Gramcko was treated at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla and then taken to jail .

According to Detective Adrian Moses, authorities are investigating the Gramcko’s criminal history but are not prepared to release any more information at this time. 

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1 comment

Jim Lissner December 18, 2018 at 3:13 pm

Per official reports generated by Redflex, Encinitas’ average ticketing in 2016 and 2017 was 51% higher than it was in 2013 and 2014. If the cameras were making the City safer, wouldn’t the ticketing be doing down, not shooting up? I’m reminded of this UT editorial from Oct. 2013, a time when El Cajon had just shut off its cameras and Poway was about to do the same:

“Let’s eliminate every trace of this bad civic memory.
And to city leaders in Oceanside, Vista, Encinitas, Solana Beach and Del Mar — it’s time to do likewise.
The cameras are simply not doing the intended job.”

Only 10% of Encinitas’ tickets are for straight thru movements (per a report the City submits annually to the Court). So, considering that fact as well as the recent large increase in the quantity of tickets, odds are that this man now facing prison time made a minor driving error – a sixth of a second late on a left turn, or slowly rolling a right turn. Encinitas’ camera tickets cost $600.00 (the fine plus $100.00 for traffic school), so I’m surprised that more people aren’t driven over the edge by California’s sky high ticket fines combined with greedy cities sifting for smaller and smaller errors. In New York state these tickets cost $50.00.

In August (2018) Encinitas’ contract with Redflex was about to expire and staff asked the City Council to OK extending the contract eight years, to 2026. In support of that request, staff presented the Council with safety statistics that were a warmed-over and slightly stirred, way out-of-date leftover – they had been prepared in-house and presented to the Council five years before, on June 26, 2013. (Those leftovers weren’t fit for consumption even when they were fresh; for that June 2013 council meeting, an independent nonprofit had submitted a 13-page report which thoroughly debunked the in-house stats. That independent report individually examined the performance of each of Encinitas’ camera installations and found, for each one, that “… it is likely that little or no safety improvement has been gained through the use of photo enforcement.”) At their August 2018 meeting the Council chose not to approve staff’s request for eight more years; instead, they made a bad compromise and voted 3 – 2 to extend the Redflex contract by another 18 months. Let us hope that sometime well before early 2020, when the contract will again come before them for renewal, the Council will ask for up-to-date stats and require that they be prepared by someone who has credentials in statistics and also is financially independent of the City.

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