Community Commentary Opinion

Place focus on the state’s storm water guidelines

Please remember that the weather as most things in nature changes, usually in cycles.

Having a knee jerk reaction to one of these cycles has been proven to be short sided.  Fact, the earth is approximately two thirds water, California is located on the Pacific Ocean on its west boundaries.

Desalination plants are being developed and used alonein this region, there are drought resistant plants as well as lawns etc.

Today, property septic system(s) may be one of these solutions.

All water use of a property using a septic system becomes recycled on the property, 100 percent.

Design, implementation and use of recycled water (gray water etc…) both in commercial and residential new buildings/development should be enforced and mandated, not optional.

Property development, landscape plans should be strongly reviewed on these two subjects and enforced using both “storm water” and “drought” guidelines.

This should become a mandatory requirement as is currently state storm water guidelines.  Do not be fooled by the simple concept of “Morphing.”

Just because today we are in a drought should not mean that we disregard prudent and sound state mandated “storm water” guidelines.

Allowing a property or project to become developed that doses not fulfill state “storm water” mandated guidelines, just because we are currently in a drought period, will prove to be harmful to us all.

When it rains, and it will, the rain run off from properties from both commercial and residential properties goes directly into its, neighbors, streets and Ocean.

Focus on current state “storm water” guidelines is even more important today due to the possible and current drought conditions.

Safety for our environment as well as our residents should be first and foremost, not profit.

Scott Carter is a Leucadia resident.

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1 comment

Bobby Fontaine June 5, 2015 at 3:30 pm

I got to thinking about what might be causing the California drought and started looking at historic California droughts,, not like doing research, I’m just a regular guy without a lot of education,, I was sitting at my computer one day with nothing to do,, I read an article about the California drought causing the land to buckle, then found a website with an archive of drought maps for the US (link below),, so I looked at them for a few hours and stumbled onto something that might be important,,

at first I thought it was simply the time of year when California droughts started and ended, like it was a seasonal thing,, later I found out that California enforces changes pollution standards at the first of the year, which appears to be when these drought occurrences begin and or end,, I also found accepted science, in fact by the top climate scientists in the world, talking about, not global warming or climate change, but something they say can be easily managed, which is changes in weather patterns caused by methane, and VOC’s that lead to low level ozone formation,, in fact they say it can be cost effective because these same pollutants also cause damage to crops and hundreds of billions of dollars worth of health care costs, which would be saved if we better regulated these VOC’s

what I discovered was that this drought began when California initiated its low carbon fuel standard on the first of the year in 2014,, I also found an expert analysis that claimed part of this LCFS strategy would increase VOC emissions while mentioning ethanol added to gasoline as one source,, so I looked closer at ethanol to find that when California changed the amount of ethanol added to gasoline from around 5% to 10% at the first of the year in 2010, the drought occurring at that time began to end,, so I looked back as far as the archive maps go to find other droughts beginning and ending around the first of the year,,

I think there is something there but I’m not smart enough to put it together

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/MapsAndData/MapArchive.aspx

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