Letters to the Editor

Televise meetings

I am shocked the public has been denied televised coverage of the controversial Ad Hoc committee’s last 20 meetings. This lacks the needed transparency for a committee that has been granted immense power to affect every Del Mar property owner.

It also is shocking that some think that the price of televised transparency and accountability is too high. The price of not knowing what is happening in these meetings is far higher.

Del Mar residents should demand more sunshine on the activities of our elected and appointed officials to ensure they are representing the best interests of the entire community.

I agree with Councilman Al Corti, but am horrified by Mayor Parks who evidently fears precedent-setting transparency and accountability. I fear elected leaders who share her viewpoint.

The Ad Hoc meetings should have been televised all along.

Gala Yayla,

Del Mar

 

Kneeling during the National Anthem

The American flag and the national anthem represent not perfection in our society — an impossibility — only the agreed-upon desire that we all want to have that perfection. That’s our standard to try to adhere to. There is no one against this, not in their right minds, anyway. There’s a distinction here that’s being missed, methinks.

The Constitution, written by American fore-founders in the mid-1700s, is a noble document. Who will deny this? It’s a paradigm for self-governance. It is our political standard that we use as our guide, and an admirable one. As a country we will always be working on holding to this. I wish all we humans were perfect, including politicians we elect, and those we assign to serve and protect.

But disrespecting the ideal of our society until anyone feels that the correct amount of perfection has been achieved seems like taking a false-noble and racially-divise stand; well-intentioned but misplaced anger. Who will say when that perfection has arrived? Who? Decide for ourselves? How capricious, no? What exactly is being disrespected here? The lack of a utopian society right now? The Constitution itself? The two-party system? The state governments? The local government where one lives? Exactly which? Resenting America’s societal imperfections because it’s not perfect right now is like resenting being human. This shared common desire is above any racial or political platforms — unless we allow ourselves to believe otherwise. It’s something we all want. Are the ideals of our society, borne by the Constitution, suddenly bad ones?

The irony of course is that it is one’s inalienable right as an American to not only disrespect, but also to misconstrue. One must admit: there’s rich irony here.

We, and our children, and their childrens’ children, will always be working on perfecting society. That’s part-and-parcel of what democracy is about. It’s never-ending. This anger-fueled separatist perspective will only serve to further separate Americans along racial lines. Que lastima (how sad), as people say here in heavily Hispanic San Diego. I love the expression, “Don’t burn the flag, wash it.”

Misguided indignation aside, this ain’t washing.

Stephen Keyes,

Encinitas

 

Unseating the incumbent

Thomas Elias’s, “Memo to Dems” in The Coast News of Sept. 9 seems generally spot on, that in California our votes for executive branch don’t often indicate the legislative branch vote. Californians have historically seen fit to maintain the checks and balances of sending one party to the White House while electing the other to Congress. However in this election year, unlike so many before, I think he overlooked a vital part of the equation that in the last six of seven-plus years, the intransigence of Washington has caused a deep and angry resentment from the governed.

This year I believe we in both parties are fed up with our representatives, or we should be. Never before in my 60 years have I witnessed a more obstructive or destructive Congress. Threats to shut down the government, default on our national debt, stifling funding for VA, irreconcilable show downs over whether or not to even have a vote on gun purchases of those on no fly lists, stalling on relief money for disasters, ignoring Zika funding and CDC requests as well as this political football of telling a sitting President that they won’t even advise and consent on his Supreme Court nominee (not because they don’t like the nominee but because they don’t like the President) is unprecedented and demonstrative of stubborn political game playing. The only thing this Congress has managed to do besides name Federal buildings and pray for guidance has been to spend millions on fruitless politically motivated investigations.

Consequently I, and many people in my district (the 49th) have had enough and are working to unseat the incumbent whatever the outcome of our presidential election farce. I’ll be voting for Col. Doug Applegate instead of Darrell Issa, a rubber stamp Republican.

Jeff Tuttle, 

Oceanside

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