Residents call for Poinsettia dog park

Residents call for Poinsettia dog park
Some residents in Carlsbad are calling for a dog park to be established in the city’s Poinsettia Community Park. Photo by Rachel Stine

CARLSBAD — Though another parks study is the in works before her proposal is even considered, Mary LeBlanc is not giving up on establishing a dog park in Poinsettia Community Park.

“There’s a lot of dogs in Carlsbad. We don’t have any place to bring them,” said LeBlanc, a 20-year Carlsbad resident who has two dogs.

Carlsbad has two dog parks, Ann L’Heureux Dog Park in the city’s northwest quadrant and Alga Norte Park in the southeast quadrant. Dogs are also allowed on city trails.

For months, LeBlanc has advocated for a dog park for residents and their furry friends in the southwest quadrant. She believes that the 42-acre Poinsettia Community Park is an ideal location and has acreage to spare.

“There’s no major cost to the city. All they have to do is put a fence in, a water foundation, maybe a bench, and some waste stations,” she said.

She began a community petition in support of her idea in January and to date has almost 600 signatures from residents in the southwest quadrant.

In November, the city completed a parks and recreation needs assessment. The report mentioned an off leash dog park as a priority for the city’s consideration.

LeBlanc initially brought her petition before City Council in February and presented again at council’s Tuesday night meeting to get an update on her proposal.

Carlsbad parks and recreation Director Chris Hazeltine said that while the needs assessment did bring forth a dog park as an option, more studies were needed before the city could consider it.

He said that the city is currently working on updating the master plans of four of Carlsbad’s oldest parks: Poinsettia Park, Aviara Park, Pine Avenue Park, and Leo Carillo Ranch.

After the master plans are updated, city staff will bring forth capital improvement project proposals, which could include a dog park, before city council early next year.

Hazeltine and Mayor Matt Hall emphasized that throughout the master plan and project proposal process there would be multiple opportunities for public input.

LeBlanc said that although she is frustrated that the city is insisting on another lengthy study, she would not be giving up.

“We’re sticking with it, we’re not going to go away. We need a dog park. The land is there,” she said.



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